Brain Art Exhibition

Brain Art Exhibition

11 Mar 20 – 12 Apr 20

Date

11 Mar 20 – 12 Apr 20

Unfortunately, tickets for this event are no longer available. Subscribe to our newsletter below to be first to hear about similar events

Please note: Following the latest advice from the Government, it is with much regret that RWA has taken the decision to close with immediate effect. Read our full statement here.

Coronavirus update: Regretfully this exhibition will not be taking place on the dates listed. To avoid missing upcoming announcements about this exhibition please sign up to our mailing list.


A free, vibrant exhibition of art by community groups and schools in the Cube Gallery and Link Space.

The exhibition coincides with the fourth Bristol Neuroscience Festival (26-28th March) being held at the Wills Memorial Building, Bristol.

The festival is a celebration of neuroscience research and the exhibition shows artwork that is broadly brain-related. This not only includes structural representations of the brain but also expressive works that look at behavioural aspects of the brain, like dementia.

Community groups and schools across Bristol and the surrounding area were invited to take part in the Brain Art Competition, run by RWA and University of Bristol Neuroscience Department. The prize winning and commended pieces of work will be displayed at the RWA, where members of the public will be able to view the work for free, during normal RWA opening hours.


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